• Bent Lorentzen
  • Klaverkoncert (1984)
    (Piano Concerto)

  • Edition Wilhelm Hansen Copenhagen (World)
  • 2.2.2.22.2.2.1timp.3percstr
  • Piano
  • 21 min

Programme Note


I. Tranquillo - Molto agitato
II. Misteriose
III. Grottesco
IV. Mol to agitato

The idea of this piano concerto came from the english pianist Rosalind Bevan, who gave the first
performance by a concert in a music-festival: Music-New Year 1985 together with the Odense
Symphonic Orchestra, who had commissioned the work. Rosalind Bevan had several times played my
Mambo for clarinet-trio, and my Warszawa for bas-clarinetto and piano.

The piano-concerto is number three among five solo-concertos: The concerto for oboe from 1980, the
cello-concerto from 1984, the saxophone-concerto from 1986 and a concerto for trumpet and
orchestra, which shall be first performed in march 1992.

Even if the piano-concerto in its four movements follows the classical symphonic form, one does not have to expect a traditional work. It is important to prepare oneself to listen to a work of a conscious sonic design, which totally breaks with the classical sound, and which in many ways are much closer to the electronic music way of thinking. One can also feel the latin rhytmic cells, that enter in many places.

The first movement is composed by the principles of echoes in many aspects. The piano takes the initiative and the orchestra takes the sound of the piano in a sort of sound-fan.

Second movement uses the piano in a non-solostic way, like a continuum or a back-ground for the metallic sound in the orchestra, combined with unusual glissandi. The character should be mysterious and also sometimes sinister and weird.

Third movement is a merry, wild and grotesque music with nightingale-effects, frog sounds, duck
calls, cork pistol and so on. The rhytm is clear latin.

Fourth movement accomplishes towards the ending the drum duel, which - even if nearly unheard – has been lying as a presentiment already from the beginning of the first movement. The music is hectic, equilibristic and tuneful.
- Bent Lorentzen



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